Being a black woman and working in urban education (Part 1)

When I first wanted to become a teacher I went to a orientation at my university for the Multiple Subject Credential program. All I wanted to do was get more information on the program and learn what I would need to do if I was to become a teacher in California. Well when I walked in, the majority of the room, about 80%, were middle age white women and the rest of the class was three black women including me, two black men, three middle eastern women, and five Latinas. Sadly I realized that the same orientation that I was taking part of reminded me of all the different classrooms that I had worked in. disappointed lhha

Ever since my first day of kindergarten I was in love with school. I don’t know what it was, but I was one of those kids that would cry at the end of the day because I had to leave school. I would love playing outside, the pet hamster that was named “Whiskers”, and even some of the schoolwork that we had to do in class. Yet times have changed since the 90’s and so has the educational system. Common Core has taken over the school system and teaching children as young as Pre-K “life skills” along with giving parents more headaches than relaxation. The “better off” school districts have more funding, which means that they won’t beg the state for educational funding compared to the “urban” areas that are always asking and never silenced. These are just some of the things that I have noticed since being apart of the educational system but in urban communities. That’s why I call it urban education. We are educating out future but there current circumstances maybe not the most promising.
the lord is testing me

Being a black women I notice things when I am in a classroom with young black boys and girls that most teachers wouldn’t notice. I know that there is a need for more black male teachers. Yes, I said it, we need more black men in the schools. We need more Ethnic Studies classes taught in k-12 education. We need to be able to have discussions with the children, not just the older children, about issues that is currently effecting the United States. They need to know there TRUE African history and where they come from. How they come from a long line of kings as queens that ruled nations. They need to learn about the concept of social capital and the importance of creating there own legacy. And yet we wonder why our black children are acting the way they are acting in the educational system.black educators 2

It’s time for us as educators to be the ones to be the change and role models in the classroom along with being able to mold the young minds for the next generation of leaders.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s